Notice: The East Wing of the Main Library is closed until 3pm on Wednesday, June 19, as we continue major construction work.  We apologize for this inconvenience. For more information or for assistance accessing library resources, please visit any of our information desks, or call 517-355-2333.
Notice: The East Wing of the Main Library is closed until 3pm on Wednesday, June 19, as we continue major construction work.  We apologize for this inconvenience. For more information or for assistance accessing library resources, please visit any of our information desks, or call 517-355-2333.
Notice: Due to ongoing construction, 4 East is currently closed to the public.  To obtain items located on 4 East, please place an online request for the item to be paged for you using the ‘Place Request’ button in the catalog. Please visit our Circulation FAQ page for assistance in using our catalog.
Notice: Due to ongoing construction, 4 East is currently closed to the public.  To obtain items located on 4 East, please place an online request for the item to be paged for you using the ‘Place Request’ button in the catalog. Please visit our Circulation FAQ page for assistance in using our catalog.

Michael Erickson's Staff Profile

517-884-1952
366 W. Circle Dr.
Mailstop 4
East Lansing, MI 48824-3700

Michael Erickson

Assigned Unit

  • Cataloging & Metadata Services: Library Assistant IV
Publications:
Author(s): Peter Cookingham, Michael Schury, Elisabeth Mabie-Flynn, Andrew Lundeen Notes: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/itsrj2016.06.0475 Publication Date: 2017-07-17 Publisher: International Turfgrass Society Volume: 13 Year: 2017 Journal: International Turfgrass Society Research Journal
Author(s): Tim Kiser, Joshua Barton, Mike Erickson, Lisa English Notes: In 2019, our library locally implemented an expanded version of the Library of Congress’s canceled 2016 plan to replace the subject headings “Aliens” and “Illegal aliens.” This presentation will describe our rationale for the change, our policy considerations, and our staging and implementation of the project, including continued upkeep. We will also compare our project to some others that have been recently undertaken by libraries around the U.S. Publication Date: 2021-05-20 URL: https://miala.org/2021_ac_breakout_session_descr.php#because Conference Location: Online Conference: Michigan Academic Library Association
Author(s): Joshua Barton, Mike Erickson, Lucas Mak, and Nicole Smeltekop Notes: In early 2019, protests erupted in Hong Kong against the extradition bill proposed by the semi-autonomous region’s government. After the bill was suspended, unrest continued with protester demands including humane treatment of protesters and universal suffrage. That fall, a zine-related listserv shared freely-downloadable zines, posters, and flyers from the protests, urging libraries to print and preserve them. Our library did so, creating metadata for the material in our shared online catalog. Cataloging material about an ongoing political (and emotional) event raised ethical issues and necessitated creative solutions. Traditional library cataloging relies on tools and resources known for dependability, not nimbleness. Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH, our controlled vocabulary) are established after reaching a “literary warrant” threshold (i.e., people are publishing on the topic) and creating them using mainstream scholarly sources can take months. Cataloging primary sources about current world events pushes LCSH to be more responsive to current trends in thinking about organizing knowledge, and in the case of the Hong Kong materials, it forefronts the perspective of those seeking justice when framing these events for posterity. Catalogers are generally trained to be “neutral” when describing material, however the field has begun to acknowledge and question implicit bias and recognize the fraught nature of creating “neutral” descriptions. Catalogers skeptical of neutrality may weigh traditional factors like creator intent, but also metadata lifecycles and the historical ramifications of descriptive work and the power of naming, as well as safety and privacy concerns for creators. We contend that cataloging materials with these factors in mind can be an act of solidarity with creators seeking justice by both disseminating access to the material and disseminating data about the material particularly through traditional, mainstream channels. Our talk will discuss these issues and explore how metadata creation with primary sources might intersect with solidarity. Publication Date: 2020-03-26 URL: https://youtu.be/J0HwLLjNIx8 Conference Location: Online Conference: Global Digital Humanities Symposium
Author(s): Mike Erickson, Tim Kiser, Lisa Robinson Publication Date: 2019-04-01 URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1P0ieHiybnNhaRH10pk7OZQunFi-W9JMh/view